Allgemeine Information über Faires Gold für Goldschmiede in Österreich: Wir schaffen Transparenz zu Recycling Gold, Fair Mining Gold, Fairtrade Gold, Green Gold, Sauberes Gold und Gütesiegel und Zertifizierungen rund um fair und responsible gold.

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Zertifizierungen und Institutionen

Zertifizierungen

Klicken Sie auf das Plussymbol links, um Detailinformationen zu der jeweiligen Zeile (zu den jeweiligen Organisationen/Initiativen, Zertifizierungen und Themengebieten) zu erhalten.

 Topics     Certification     
TopicsFTs GFTs EGARMs FMRJCs CoPRJCs CoCLBMAs RGGIRMAs SRMCFSIs CFSWGCs CFGSICGLRs RCMBGRs CTC
Origin means the source of the Gold the audited Company is working with. Some Standards are applicable to companies that source their Gold only from Artisanal and Small-scale Mining organizations (ASM), while others are applied to companies, which Gold comes just from Industrial Mines.

Globale Organisationen/Initiativen                                                          Globale Zertifizierungen
  FT: Fairtrade                                                                                                G: Gold, EG: Eco Gold
  ARM: Alliance for Responsible Mining                                                        FM: Fairmined Standard
  RJC: Responsible Jewellery Council                                                          CoP: Code of Practice, CoC: Chain-of-Custody
  LBMA: London Bullion Market Association                                                RGG: Responsible Gold Guidance
  IRMA: Initiative for Responsible Mining Assurance                                    SRM: Standard for Responsible Mining
  CFSI: Conflict-Free Sourcing Initiative                                                        CFS: Conflict-Free Smelter Program
  WGC: World Gold Council                                                                          CFGS: Conflict-Free Gold Standard Zertifizierung
Lokale Organisationen/Initiativen*                                                          Lokale Zertifizierung*
  ICGLR*: International Conference on the Great Lake Regions                  RCM*: Regional Certification Mechanism
  BGR*: Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe                     CTC*: Certified Trading Chains
OriginFTs GFTs EGARMs FMRJCs CoPRJCs CoCLBMAs RGGIRMAs SRMCFSIs CFSWGCs CFGSICGLRs RCM*BGRs CTC*
Industrial Origin: The Standard covers companies that either source Gold from Industrial Mines or are Industrial Mining Companies themselves. Industrial Originyes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4
ASM Origin: The Standard include companies that either source Gold from Artisanal and Small-scale Mining (ASM) organizations or are ASM organizations themselves. ASM generally denote those mining activities which commonly use low technological inputs and are carried out often informally in developing countries. See more at: www.miningfacts.org (external link)ASM Originyes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4
Recycling: The Standard convers companies that uses recycled Gold. Recycled Gold is the Gold which after being refined and sold to either a bank, manufacturer, retailer or a final costumer is afterwards reintegrated in the smelting and refining process. See more at: www.responsiblejewellery.com (external link)Recyclingyes4yes4yes4yes4
Apply to: The Standards of the table presents differences in terms of the selectable actors (businesses) involved in the supply chain. While some Standards are just applicable to one specific actor within the supply chain, others target all the actors involved in the chain.

Globale Organisationen/Initiativen                                                          Globale Zertifizierungen
  FT: Fairtrade                                                                                                G: Gold, EG: Eco Gold
  ARM: Alliance for Responsible Mining                                                        FM: Fairmined Standard
  RJC: Responsible Jewellery Council                                                          CoP: Code of Practice, CoC: Chain-of-Custody
  LBMA: London Bullion Market Association                                                RGG: Responsible Gold Guidance
  IRMA: Initiative for Responsible Mining Assurance                                    SRM: Standard for Responsible Mining
  CFSI: Conflict-Free Sourcing Initiative                                                        CFS: Conflict-Free Smelter Program
  WGC: World Gold Council                                                                          CFGS: Conflict-Free Gold Standard Zertifizierung
Lokale Organisationen/Initiativen*                                                          Lokale Zertifizierung*
  ICGLR*: International Conference on the Great Lake Regions                  RCM*: Regional Certification Mechanism
  BGR*: Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe                     CTC*: Certified Trading Chains
Apply toFTs GFTs EGARMs FMRJCs CoPRJCs CoCLBMAs RGGIRMAs SRMCFSIs CFSWGCs CFGSICGLRs RCMBGRs CTC
Mining company: The Standard is applicable to Mining companies, which means that the certification is given to a specific mining company that will be therefore subjected to an audit process.Mining Company
yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4
Trader/Exporter: The Standard is applicable to traders and/or exporters involved in the commercialization of Gold after being mined. These traders or exporters are all the possible intermediaries between mines and smelters/refiners which means that the certification is given to traders and/or exporters that will be subjected to an audit process.Trader/Exporteryes4yes4
Smelter/Refinery: The Standard is applicable to smelting and refining companies. These are the actors involved in the refinement of Gold, a process whereby Gold has to go through in order to be sold to Banks, Jewelers or technological companies. In this case the certified entity is the smelting or refining company which will be subjected to an audit process.Smelter/Refinery                                      yes4yes4
The whole supply chain: The Standard is applicable to all companies involved throughout the supply chain of gold. This implies that the metal has to be entirely traceable for the certifying entity and the third party auditor. Usually in this case a chain of custody mechanism needs to be implemented in order to check that the certified metal is not lost or mixed with other non-certified metals. Therefore for this Standard it is crucial that the actors involved in the handling of the certified metal are all integrated in such a way that every actor in the supply chain can distinguish and treat the certified metal according to the Standard´s requirements.The whole Supply Chainyes4yes4yes4yes4
General criteria (used to be System)

Globale Organisationen/Initiativen                                                          Globale Zertifizierungen
  FT: Fairtrade                                                                                                G: Gold, EG: Eco Gold
  ARM: Alliance for Responsible Mining                                                        FM: Fairmined Standard
  RJC: Responsible Jewellery Council                                                          CoP: Code of Practice, CoC: Chain-of-Custody
  LBMA: London Bullion Market Association                                                RGG: Responsible Gold Guidance
  IRMA: Initiative for Responsible Mining Assurance                                    SRM: Standard for Responsible Mining
  CFSI: Conflict-Free Sourcing Initiative                                                        CFS: Conflict-Free Smelter Program
  WGC: World Gold Council                                                                          CFGS: Conflict-Free Gold Standard Zertifizierung
Lokale Organisationen/Initiativen*                                                          Lokale Zertifizierung*
  ICGLR*: International Conference on the Great Lake Regions                  RCM*: Regional Certification Mechanism
  BGR*: Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe                     CTC*: Certified Trading Chains
SystemFTs GFTs EGARMs FMRJCs CoPRJCs CoCLBMAs RGGIRMAs SRMCFSIs CFSWGCs CFGSICGLRs RCMBGRs CTC
Legal Business: Certified organizations have to have a mechanism to ensure compliance with Applicable Law.Legal Business
yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4
Official Mining Licenses: The certified mining company or the associated companies have to ensure that required official permissions (usually given by a government) are granted to the mining activities.Official Mining Licenses
yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4
No illegal activities (Money Laundering): The certified company shall ensure that the company and its partners in the supply chain are not involved in illegal activities such as Money Laundering. To do that the company has to have an internal control mechanism in place, which allows it to identify, to inform the authorities concerned and to prevent such activities to happen within their supply chain.No illegal Activities
yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4
Transparent Financial Accounting: The certified company has to keep an account of all business transactions following international accounting standards and has to be annually audited by a qualified independent auditing firm.Transparent Accounting
yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4
Public Disclosure policy: Following the mandate of the “Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act” the certified company has to publicly disclose information about payments the company, subsidiaries or affiliates have made to any government for the development of their extractive activities in an annual report and post it online.Public Disclosure
yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4
Internal democratic structure: This criterion is only required by the Fairtrade Standard and applies only to ASM organizations. According to this criterion the ASM organization shall maintain a democratic decision making structure in place that allows members to have an effective control over it. This includes that the board of the ASM organization has to be accountable to its members.Democratic Structure
yes4yes4
Grievance Procedure: The certified company shall have a mechanism through which complaints or grievances from interested parties (e.g. community members, employees) are properly processed. An appropriate grievance procedure needs to be accessible to all interested parties, transparent and effective. This means that the company have to designate a responsible person to deal directly with grievances; that processes for documenting grievances, concerns and corrective measures need to be in place; and that a timeframe needs to be set for the investigations and final decision making after summiting the grievance in order to timely respond to it. It is imperative that interested parties whether acting individually or with others shall be free to submit a grievance without suffering any penalty or retaliation.Grievance Procedure
yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4
Social Issues

Globale Organisationen/Initiativen                                                          Globale Zertifizierungen
  FT: Fairtrade                                                                                                G: Gold, EG: Eco Gold
  ARM: Alliance for Responsible Mining                                                        FM: Fairmined Standard
  RJC: Responsible Jewellery Council                                                          CoP: Code of Practice, CoC: Chain-of-Custody
  LBMA: London Bullion Market Association                                                RGG: Responsible Gold Guidance
  IRMA: Initiative for Responsible Mining Assurance                                    SRM: Standard for Responsible Mining
  CFSI: Conflict-Free Sourcing Initiative                                                        CFS: Conflict-Free Smelter Program
  WGC: World Gold Council                                                                          CFGS: Conflict-Free Gold Standard Zertifizierung
Lokale Organisationen/Initiativen*                                                          Lokale Zertifizierung*
  ICGLR*: International Conference on the Great Lake Regions                  RCM*: Regional Certification Mechanism
  BGR*: Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe                     CTC*: Certified Trading Chains
Social IssuesFTs GFTs EGARMs FMRJCs CoPRJCs CoCLBMAs RGGIRMAs SRMCFSIs CFSWGCs CFGSICGLRs RCMBGRs CTC
No Tolerance to Serious Human Rights Violations: The certified company shall ensure that the company and associated third parties bellow in the supply chain do not tolerate any serious abuses of human rights. This implies that the company have to have a mechanism in place to corroborate if such abuses have been committed and to take the required measures. The following are regarded as serious violations of human rights:
- any forms of torture, cruel, inhuman and degrading treatment;
- any forms of forced or compulsory labour, which means work or service which is exacted from any person under the menace of penalty and for which said person has not offered himself voluntarily;
- the worst forms of child labour;
- other gross human rights violations and abuses such as widespread sexual violence;
- war crimes or other serious violations of international humanitarian law, crimes against humanity or genocide.
More information: www.oecd.org
No serious Human Rights Violations
yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4
Human Rights Due Diligence procedure: The certified company shall have mechanisms that aims to identify, prevent and mitigate human rights abuses and to keep an account of how the company and associated third parties address their impacts on human rights.HR due Diligence Procedure
yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4
Healthy and secure working conditions: The certified company shall ensure that the conditions provided by the company and associated third parties are safe and healthy in compliance with applicable law and other relevant international standards.Healthy and secure working Conditions
yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4
Social security: The certified company shall ensure that its workers have access to social security and pension following applicable law and in absence of a formal social security system the company shall provide an alternative such as a social security fund organized by the company.Social security
yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4
Employment conditions: The certified company shall ensure that its workers are informed and understand the terms of their employment. This means that they know their rights and duties particularly in regards to wages, working hours, benefits, social security and work rules.Employment Conditions
yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4
Freedom of association and collective bargain: The certified company shall respects the rights of workers to freely associate and conform trade unions that are independently organized and governed by workers. Similarly the company shall respect the right of workers to collective bargaining and comply with the agreements that from such collective bargaining process emerge.Freedom of Association
yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4
Freedom of association and collective bargain: The certified company shall respects the rights of workers to freely associate and conform trade unions that are independently organized and governed by workers. Similarly the company shall respect the right of workers to collective bargaining and comply with the agreements that from such collective bargaining process emerge.Right to Collective Bargainyes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4
Child protection: The certified company shall ensure that Children are protected from any Worst Forms of Child Labour and shall develop a remediation process wherever child labour is found. Following the International Labour Organization (ILO) convention 182 and recommendations 190 Worst Forms of Child Labour include:
- Hazardous Child Labour, which by its nature or circumstances is likely to jeopardise the Health, Safety or morals of persons younger than 18 years.
- All forms of child slavery and practices similar to slavery, including debt bondage, the trafficking of children, forced child labour and the use of children in armed conflict.
- Child Labour Remediation processes shall safeguard the welfare of the Child, taking into account the financial situation of the Child’s family. Remediation includes:
- Immediate withdraw of any labouring Children.
- For Children finishing compulsory education, support them finding alternative income generation and/or training.
- For School-age Children, support the Child to attend and remain in school until the completion of compulsory education.
- Have a monitoring system of the company´s approach on avoiding Child Labour, oriented to identify causes of non-compliance and improve control mechanisms to avoid any recurrence.
Child Protection
yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4
No Child Labour: The certified company shall not engage in or support Child Labour. Following the ILO Convention 138 and Recommendation 146, the minimum age for work are set as follows: A basic minimum working age of 15 years, to enable Children to complete compulsory schooling. Some Standards consent certified companies working in developing countries, where in some cases compulsory education ends earlier than 15 years, that they initially permit a minimum working age of 14 provided Applicable Law allows it.No Child Labouryes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4
No Support to illegal armed groups/terrorists: The certified company shall not provide any kind of support to illegal armed groups or terrorist through its economic activities. Illegal armed groups conveys a range of organizations including public or private armed forces taking part in a determined conflict, which can be engaged in activities such as: illegal control of mine sites, transportation routes and points through which minerals are traded; illegal taxes or extorts, money or minerals at mine sites, points of access to mine sites, along transportation routes, or where minerals are traded. Terrorist in this case refers to those armed groups involved in criminal acts to provoke terror in targeted populations.No Support to illegal armed Groups
yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4
Security from armed conflicts: Where a certified company or its associated third parties are operating in ‘conflict-affected or high-risk’ areas the company shall ensure that security to its employees is provided whether at mining sites or other owned facilities involved in the handling of the precious material before export. In this case security means company´s employees or third parties (including government forces) contracted and/or paid to ensure the security of the facilities and its employees. At the same time the certified company and its associated third parties shall ensure that the security personnel have not been implicated in human rights abuses and/or committed any unlawful acts such as bribery and extortion.Security from armed Conflicts
yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4
Free Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC): The certified company operating or planning to operate in areas with presence of indigenous people shall receive a FPIC from these indigenous communities before they keep operating or start a new mining operation. The FPIC means that Indigenous groups have the option to give consent to any project affecting their communities and territories free from external manipulation, coercion and intimidation; that they will be notified, sufficiently in advance of commencement of any activities, that consent will be sought; that the company provide full disclosure of information regarding all aspects of a proposed project or activity in a manner that is accessible and understandable to the people whose consent is being sought; acknowledgment that the people whose consent is being sought can approve or reject a project or activity, and that the entities seeking consent will abide by the decision. FPIC is an internationally recognized right of local communities and particularly indigenous people to participate in decision making about issues that affect them.Free Prior Informed Concent (FPIC)
yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4
Social involvement: The certified company shall engage with local communities impacted or that will be impacted by its mining operations. The described level of engagement and specificity of actions varies between the Standards but in general they coincide in that:
- The affected communities and stakeholders are approached and informed by the company in issues that affect them.
- The project or mining operations have to enjoy social legitimacy from the local communities and stakeholders.
- The affected communities and stakeholders participates in the decisions about company´s operations that affect them.
- The operating company have to take into account concerns and grievances from local communities and stakeholders.
- The certified company support local communities´ development process, giving support to community initiatives.
Social Involvement
yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4
Recognition of Indigenous and ethnic groups: The certified company operating or planning to operate in areas with presence of indigenous people and other ethnic groups shall respect their particular rights which are internationally recognized by multilateral organizations such as the UN. An imperative right of indigenous and ethnic groups in this regard is the right to their territory, even if this is not formally recognized by national governments the operating company have to recognize this right in order to operate. This implies that the certified company have to undertake consultations with the local indigenous or ethnic groups to reach agreements with regards to the impacts and benefits of mining operations in that indigenous or ethnic territory.
More information: www.un.org
Recognition of Indigenous Groupsyes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4
Gender Program: The certified company shall have a gender policy at the workplace which recognizes the disadvantageous conditions of women in society and tries to improve their position in the company particularly with respect to recruitment, access to training, benefits and promotions.Gender Programyes4yes4yes4yes4
Ecology

Globale Organisationen/Initiativen                                                          Globale Zertifizierungen
  FT: Fairtrade                                                                                                G: Gold, EG: Eco Gold
  ARM: Alliance for Responsible Mining                                                        FM: Fairmined Standard
  RJC: Responsible Jewellery Council                                                          CoP: Code of Practice, CoC: Chain-of-Custody
  LBMA: London Bullion Market Association                                                RGG: Responsible Gold Guidance
  IRMA: Initiative for Responsible Mining Assurance                                    SRM: Standard for Responsible Mining
  CFSI: Conflict-Free Sourcing Initiative                                                        CFS: Conflict-Free Smelter Program
  WGC: World Gold Council                                                                          CFGS: Conflict-Free Gold Standard Zertifizierung
Lokale Organisationen/Initiativen*                                                          Lokale Zertifizierung*
  ICGLR*: International Conference on the Great Lake Regions                  RCM*: Regional Certification Mechanism
  BGR*: Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe                     CTC*: Certified Trading Chains
EcologyFTs GFTs EGARMs FMRJCs CoPRJCs CoCLBMAs RGGIRMAs SRMCFSIs CFSWGCs CFGSICGLRs RCMBGRs CTC
Management of toxic substance: the certified company shall ensure that in its mining facilities or in the facilities of associated third parties hazardous substances are managed in a manner that prevent workers from getting poisoned and that prevent these substances to leak into waterbodies accessed by surrounding communities or into other areas in which the substance pose a risk to public health and the environment. Particularly in the process of recovering the precious metal from the ore toxic substances such as mercury and cyanide are used. Due to the high risk these substances represent for human health and the environment the Standards including this criterion encourage the use of alternative technique for the recovery of the metal, wherever economically possible. But when alternative recovery methods are not available a proper management of these toxic substances is required. Such a management means that:
- Just trained personnel have to manipulate these substances.
- Personnel handling these substances have to have appropriate protection equipment such as gloves and masks.
- Substances have to be handle in limited designated areas, which exclude residencies, or any area close to a body of water.
- Workers and community dwellers have to be informed by the company about the risks and precautions regarding these hazardous substances through Safety Data Sheets or equivalent tools.
- Hazardous substances have to be storage in limited designated areas, which can be only accessed by authorized trained personnel.
- The company have to keep an inventory of the hazardous substances at facilities.
Management of toxic Substancesyes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4
Waste Management: the certified company shall ensure in its mining operations or in its associated third parties mining operations that mine wastes are managed in a way that mitigate offsite pollution and that allows future alternative uses of the land when mining activities are terminated (e.g. for agricultural or forestry purposes). Mine waste include tailings (dumps from the process of separating the valuable material from the uneconomic part), waste rock, and overburden (mainly soil and other materials removed from the earth crust to extract the mineral). To manage tailings and waste rock a tailings dam and a waste rock dump have to be created and monitored periodically to assess its resistance to seismic and hydrologic phenomena. Additionally facilities needs to be monitored periodically to detect any risk for contamination. The dams and dumps need to be properly covered at the time of closure in order to allow future revegetation or other land uses.Waste Managementyes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4
Environmental protection measures: The certified company shall ensure that its mining operations and the mining operations from associated third parties minimize their impact on the environment. This means that their mining and related activities respect and support in any way possible the effective safeguard of designated protected areas. The Standards particularly discourage any new explorations or mining project in protected areas. At the same time it demands that wherever a mining facility is already working in a protected area the company shall look for local consultancy with local and national authorities in topics such as the feasibility of the mining facility to keep working or not; and possible compensations for damages.Environmental Protection Measures
yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4
Water Management: The certified company shall ensure that water in mining facilities is efficiently managed in a manner that do not limit or reduce access to water to surrounding communities and that does not pollute or reduce de quality of waterbodies in the vicinity through dewatering processes. A proper water management system requires that from the beginning of the mining project a complete record of all superficial and underwater networks that the mining operations can impact. With this information the company shall take measures to use water efficiently and to prevent leakage of hazardous substances or sediments to surrounding waterbodies while dewatering.Water Managementyes4yes4yes4
Noise control measures: The certified company shall ensure that pre-mine aural conditions are protected and maintain through the reduction and control of noise pollution. This implies that surrounding communities are protected from the noises of the mining operations and that workers have the conditions and required equipment to prevent any negative consequences of noise in their health and productivity. In terms of concrete measures, the Standard demands that the mine shall not emit noise, measured at the facility boundary, greater than 70 decibels (dB) at any time. During the hours of 6 p.m. to 8 a.m. the mine shall not emit noise greater than 55 dB. (This is a criterion only requested by the IRMA Standard)Noise Control Measures
yes4
Rehabilitation and closure plan: The certified mining company shall have a rehabilitation and closure plan that ensure the future use of the land according to local priorities. In the case of new mining projects there have to be a comprehensive rehabilitation plan from the beginning and in the case of already operating facilities a rehabilitation plan needs to be put immediately in place. Such a plan requires that:
- The restoration of the land shall be as close as possible to the conditions that existed before mining operations or suitable for intended post-mining use of the land.
- Consultations with local communities and other stakeholders take place regarding the rehabilitation plan and possible post-mining use of the land.
- The rehabilitation must occur within a determined period after closure, which need to be stablished in consultation with local communities and stakeholders.
- The mining company shall calculate costs for the rehabilitation and closure and shall finance its implementation.
Rehabilitation and Closure Plan
yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4yes4
Eco-gold: The certified ASMO shall not use mercury or cyanide for recovering gold. Just non-toxic technics, such as gravimetric methods, are used. In order to make provenance claims of dealing with a certified Ecological Gold a complete documental and physical traceability of the certified mineral throughout the whole supply chain (from first buyer to final retailer). The production of Ecological Gold receive a premium that intent to stimulate ASMO to change to ecological production and compensate for economic losses due to the typical low gold recovery of the applied non-toxic technics.
(This criterion appears just in the Fair Trade Eco Gold and Fairmined Standard. Therefore only applies to ASMO)
Eco-Goldyes4yes4

Initiativen & Zertifizierungen

Klicken Sie auf das Plussymbol links, um Detailinformationen zu der jeweiligen Organisation/Initiative und deren Zertifizierungen zu erhalten.

 Initiative/Standard
General Info
FAIRTRADEFairtrade consists of a system of organizations around the world that through a set of actions promotes better trading conditions to, and securing the rights of, marginalized producers and workers – particularly in developing countries. The international Fairtrade system includes three producer networks, 25 Fairtrade organizations, Fairtrade International, and FLOCERT, the independent certification body of the global Fairtrade system. Among the actions that Fairtrade implements are:
1. Develop and review Fairtrade Standards, which are applicable to different actors across the trading chain of Fairtrade certified products such as producers, importers, exporters and licensees.
2. Support producers to achieve Fairtrade certification and develop market opportunities through training, guidance on certification and facilitating contact with buyers.
3. Coordinate Fairtrade strategies at local and global level to address emerging issues.
4. Position the need for trade justice in debates on trade and development, through advocacy actions.

Fairtrade Standard for Gold
FAIRTRADE_GOLDThe Fairtrade Standard for Gold and Associated Precious Metals for Artisanal and Small-Scale Mining aim to generate opportunities for artisanal and small-scale miners, through promoting formalization in the artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) sector by establishing artisanal and small-scale mining organizations (ASMO). The final goals are to improve working conditions for miners and strengthened mining organizations in their capacity to influence policy making in issues of interest for the ASMOs and their communities such as responsible mining; environmental management; social security; gender equality; child protection and the elimination of child labour in mining communities; the well-being of families and children, fairer market access; benefits to local communities in mineral-rich areas; and improved governance within the ASM sector. Fairtrade emphasizes that the Standard is neither intended for new gold rush situations, nor for newcomer mining in environmentally sensitive areas.

The standard applies to ASMOs in countries where producers’ organizations can be certified, and to traders buying and selling precious metals produced by these ASMOs. Similarly to other Fairtrade certifications the Fairtrade Standard for Gold establishes a Fairtrade Minimum Price and an incentive scheme whereby the ASMO receive a premium for the delivery of certified Fairtrade gold. The Fairtrade Minimum Price is meant to reduce the risks for producers when market prices fall. The Fairtrade Minimum Price for Gold and Silver is set based on the London Bullion Market Association (LBMA) fixing for gold and silver and the London Platinum and Palladium Market (LPPM) for platinum. The Premium is though as a “reward” for compliance with responsible mining practices, but also as a mean to provide miners with the funds necessary for development.

Contact Info
Fairtrade International (FLO)
Bonner Talweg 177
53129 Bonn, Germany
Email: info@fairtrade.net
Telephone: +49 228 949230
Fax +49 228 2421713

Fairtrade Austria
Neulinggasse 29/17
A- 1030 Vienna, Austria
Tel.: +43 1 533 09 56
Fax: +43 1 533 09 56 11
E-Mail: office@fairtrade.at
Website: www.fairtrade.at/produzenten/weitere-produkte/goldsilber
Fairtrade (FT)
General Info
ARMThe Alliance for Responsible Mining (ARM) is a global initiative established in 2004 to enhance equity and wellbeing in artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) communities through improved social, environmental and labour practices, good governance and the implementation of ecosystem restoration practices. The main work of the initiative consists of two interrelated lines of action. On the one hand is the setting of the “Fairmined Standards” for responsible ASM. And on the other is giving support to producers to deliver "Fairmined" certified metals and minerals through economically just supply chains to the markets. The final goals are to make a contribution towards the transformation of ASM into a socially and environmentally responsible activity, and to improve the quality of life of marginalized artisanal miners, their families and communities.
ARM’s work concentrate in standard setting, producers support and communications. Its scope is the extractive industries, with emphasis on artisanal and small-scale mining that extract mainly gold.

Fairmined Standard
ARMThe Fairmined Standard for Gold from Artisanal and Small-scale Mining, including associated precious metals consist of a scheme created only for artisanal and small-scale miners to promote the progressive organization and formalization of the ASM sector, bringing with it improved labor rights, safer working conditions for miners, and strengthened miners’ organizations with the capacity to lobby for legislation and public policies that promote their rights and enable a responsible ASM sector. ARM stresses that the Standard is neither though for new gold rush situations, nor for newcomer mining in environmentally sensitive areas.

Specific objectives of the Standard are:
1. To stimulate an improved environmental management, especially mitigating the effects of use of mercury and other toxic chemicals, enhancing ecological restoration, and responsible water management.
2. To promote the wellbeing of families and children in mining communities, bringing better social security, gender equality, child protection and the elimination of child labor in certified organizations.
3. To encourage ASMOs to become economically, technically, environmentally and socially viable businesses, according to their dimensions and particularities.
4. To benefit local communities in mineral rich ecosystems, and improves governance in the mining sector through fairer market access and a premium for social investment.

Contact Info
Calle 32 B SUR # 44 A 61
Envigado, Colombia
Tel: +57 (4) 332 47 11
Email: E-Mail: arm@responsiblemines.org
Website: www.fairmined.org
Alliance for Responsible Mining (ARM)
General Info
The RJC is a standards initiative for the jewelry supply chain, from mine to retail. Its purpose is to stimulate in the diamond and jewelry industry commitment to a responsible supply chain and implementation of responsible business practices. The RJC was formed in 2005 by a group of 14 organizations from a cross section of the diamond and gold jewelry business. These founding organizations were ABN AMRO, BHP Billiton Diamonds, Cartier (part of Richemont), World Jewellery Confederation, Diamond Trading Company (part of De Beers), Diarough, Jewelers of America, National Association of Goldsmiths (UK), Newmont Mining, Rio Tinto, Rosy Blue, Signet Group, Tiffany & Co., and Zale Corporation. One of the main interest of this initiative is to increase consumer confidence that the extraction and handling of diamonds and precious metals sourced by the companies involved are socially and environmentally responsible.

RJC Standards mechanisms

Code of Practice (COP)
A biding Code of Practice for any company member or interested in being a member of RJC. The Code include 6 different categories of aspects which are important for the initiative. 1. Improvement of legal and regulatory compliance, reporting, and promotion of responsible business practices to Business Partners. 2. Increase due diligence in their respective minerals supply chain in regards to respect of human rights, community development, anti-corruption efforts and managing sourcing risks. 3. Increase level of compliance with international labour conventions particularly in terms of work conditions in the supply chain. 4. Ensure implementation of practices that protect health, safety and the environment. 5. Ensure use of appropriate disclosure and the control of the information regarding the sourcing of precious metals and diamonds 6. Increase the implementation of responsible exploration and mining practices for the production of Jewellery products.

Chain-of-Custody certification (CoC)
A voluntary Standard which complements the COP and focuses just in the gold and platinum group metals. It consists in improving the traceability of the material across the supply chain to ensure that the practices involving the management of the eligible material (gold and platinum group metals) comply with the COP. A particular interest here is to be able to claim that the eligible material is conflict-free.

Website: www.responsiblejewellery.com/rjc-certification/code-of-practices-certification13
Responsible Jewelry Council (RJC)
General Info
The London Bullion Market Association is the organization that represents the World’s largest and most important market for gold and silver bullions. As the name suggests the association is based in London and have around 149 members around the globe, which includes the majority of the central banks that hold gold, private sector investors, mining companies, traders, refiners, fabricators, as well as those providing storage and secure carrier services.
The main work of the LBMA revolves around four different operations. One of the most important is the elaboration and management of the Good Delivery List (GDL). The GDL is a worldwide accepted list of gold and silver refiners which are certified to deliver a high-quality gold/silver bar to the LBM and at the same time the list works as a worldwide reference for clients and investors interested in trading with gold and silver. To appear in the list the refiners have to comply with determined quality standards that the LBM requires. Another operation is the coordination of the Loco London, which is a Marketplace for members and associates of the LBMA that allows them to trade and transfer gold or silver bullions between their accounts in London. Another recently acquired operation is the price benchmarking of different precious metals. Since 2014 Precious Metal Prices is an owned subsidiary of the LBMA, which is the entity in charge of establishing Benchmarks for price fixing of Gold, Silver, Platinum and Palladium. Finally the LBMA has created the Responsible Gold Guidance (RGG), a Standard mechanism to certify “conflict-free” gold delivered to the LBM.

Responsible Gold Guidance
The Responsible Gold Guidance is a Standard created to ensure that the extraction and handling of the gold delivered by the refiners of the GDL respect human rights, comply with standards of anti-money laundering, do not contribute to conflicts and prevent terrorist financing. This Standard follows the five steps framework for due diligence of the OECD Due Diligence Guidance for Responsible Supply Chains of Minerals from Conflict-Affected and High-Risk Areas and follows the requirements of the OECD Gold Supplement.

The five steps consist of:
1. Establishing strong company management systems.
2. Identifying and assessing risk in the supply chain.
3. Designing and implementing a management strategy to respond to identified risks.
4. Arranging for an independent third-party audit of the supply chain due diligence.
5. Reporting on supply chain due diligence.

All Refiners producing LBMA good delivery gold bars, which is the targeted group to be certified, must comply with the RGG in order to remain on the GDL. Any Refiner applying to be part of the GDL must implement the RGG and be audited prior to becoming a member of the Good Delivery List. The LBMA is working together with other similar initiatives particularly in the mutual recognitions of audits in the case of the Responsible Jewellery Council (RJC), and the Conflict-Free Sourcing Initiative (CFSI), while the World Gold Council (WGC) support refiners Due Diligence for mined gold for LBMA, RJC and EICC.

Contact Info
1-2 Royal Exchange Buildings
Royal Exchange
London EC3V 3LF
United Kingdom
Tel: +44 (0) 20 7796 3067
Fax: +44 (0) 20 7283 0030
Email: mail@lbma.org.uk
Website: www.lbma.org.uk/responsible-gold
London Bullion Market Association (LBMA)
General Info
Founded in 2006 by a coalition of nongovernment organizations, businesses purchasing minerals and metals for resale in other products, affected communities, mining companies, and trade unions, IRMA is developing standards for environmental and social issues related to mining, including labor rights, human rights, indigenous peoples and cultural heritage, conflict response, pollution control and site closure." The organizations involved are interested in developing a comprehensive and inclusive standardization mechanism for responsible mining that enjoy credibility not just from the private sector but also from the civil society (NGO, communities and labor organisations).

Standard for Responsible Mining (SRM)

Aims to be a Standard that specifies best practice performance requirements that are applicable to all kinds of industrial mining worldwide, which are designed to be independently auditable at the mine site level, and that are supported by leading companies as well as civil society organizations.
Once completed, the IRMA Standard will consist of six integrated elements:
"The international IRMA Standard for Responsible Mining, endorsed by leading stakeholders from all key stakeholder groups";
"A trusted, independent, third-party mechanism to verify implementation of the standard";
"Communication tools (such as certificates, approved claims and labels) to generate rewards for companies that implement the standard";
"Mechanisms for resolving disputes relating to the implementation of the IRMA system";
"A membership program designed to generate and maintain long-term support for the system from all key stakeholder groups";
"An organizational structure sufficient to ensure the long-term stability and success of the system as a whole (for example through one or more legal entities and associated personnel, governance and financial resources)".

Contact Info
Initiative for Responsible Mining Assurance (IRMA)
P.O. Box 66236 Washington
DC 20035-6236
Website: www.responsiblemining.net/responsible-mining
Initiative for Responsible Mining Assurance (IRMA)
General Info

Conflict-Free Gold Standard
The Conflict-Free Gold Standard has been developed to establish a common approach whereby gold producers can assess and provide assurance that their gold has been extracted in a manner that does not cause, support or benefit unlawful armed conflict or contribute to serious human rights abuses or breaches of international humanitarian law. To certify that a company comply with the mentioned criteria established by the Standard, an independent external audit have to take place. The Standard follows the OECD Supplement on Gold to “support and advance the recommendations of the OECD Due Diligence Guidance for Responsible Supply Chains of Minerals from Conflict-Affected and High-Risk Areas”. This means that a conformance with the Standard, in addition to existing business controls and practices, will result in conformance with the OECD Guidance and the accompanying Supplement on Gold.

The Standard is expected to be used by WGC member companies and other companies involved in the extraction of gold in order to demonstrate that their gold has been extracted in a manner that does not cause, support or benefit unlawful armed conflict or contribute to serious human rights abuses or breaches of international humanitarian law. In this sense the Standard is intended to support them in conforming with regulation and legally-binding guidance relating to responsible mining in areas assessed to be “conflict-affected or high-risk”.
The Standard also support refiners in meeting their due diligence requirements. Particularly, companies who conform to the Standard will issue a Management Statement of Conformance which can be used as supporting evidence by refiners to demonstrate compliance with the London Bullion Market Association Responsible Gold Guidance. Additionally, in an effort to avoid duplication of efforts, the WGC works with other similar initiatives to mutually recognize audits whenever criteria and assurance mechanisms coincide.

Contact Info
World Gold Council - Head Office
10 Old Bailey
London
EC4M 7NG
United Kingdom
Tel: +44 20 7826 4700
Fax: +44 20 7826 4799
Email: info@gold.org
Website: www.gold.org/gold-mining/responsible-mining/conflict-free
World Gold Council (WGC)
General Info
The International Conference on the Great Lakes Region (ICGLR) is an inter-governmental organization of countries from the African Great Lakes Region. Its establishment was based on the recognition that in order to overcome political instability and conflict in these countries require a concerted regional effort in order to promote sustainable peace and development. The organization is composed of twelve member states, namely: Angola, Burundi, Central African Republic, Republic of Congo, Democratic Republic of Congo, Kenya, Uganda, Rwanda, Republic of South Sudan, Sudan, Tanzania and Zambia. These members have agreed to a “Pact on Security, Stability and Development in the Great Lakes Region” which provides the framework and the programmes of actions to the ICGLR. The ICGLR Executive Secretariat has the responsibility to coordinate, facilitate, monitor and thereby ensure the implementation of the Pact in order to attain peace, security, political stability and development in the Great Lakes Region. Among the different responsibilities that the Pact assigned to the ICGLR Executive Secretariat is the definition of common standards and approaches to relevant issues in the Great Lakes Region.

Regional Certification Mechanism
The ICGLR Regional Certification Mechanism (RCM) is a compulsory regional standard for the certification of tin, tantalum, tungsten and gold sourced from any ICGLR Member State. The RCM follows the OECD Due Diligence Guidance for Responsible Supply Chains of Minerals from Conflict-Affected and High-Risk Areas. The RCM allows downstream users (from smelters/refiners to retailers) to source the designated minerals from the Great Lakes Region in compliance with the OECD requirements. It also enables Governments to enhance formalization and transparency of mineral and revenues flows, mainly originating from artisanal and small-scale mining operations, and the private mining sector to re-gain access to international markets.

Each member state is responsible for the implementation of the RCM within its borders. The implementation contemplates three main actions:
1. Mine Site Inspection and Validation, which requires periodical assessments of a mine site and the determination of its conformity with the established RCM mine site Standard.
2. Chain of Custody Tracking. Once a mine site comply with the Standard, there have to be a system in place that can track mineral flows from a certified mine site to the point of export.
3. Certification of Mineral Exports. This is the system implemented by member states for certifying mineral exports and issuing certificates once the designated mineral reach the point of export with the required process.

The responsibility of the ICGLR Secretariat in this regard is to set and supervise the RCM standard. The Secretariat monitors and supervises the progress of implementation to ensure the credibility of the system. Additionally, the Secretariat is supporting the establishment of assurance mechanisms such as the Independent Mineral Chain Auditor, the Audit Committee and the Regional whistleblowing mechanism.

Contact Info
Avenue du Gouvernement,
P.O.BOX 7076, Bujumbura, Burundi
Tel: (257) 22 25 68 24/5/7/9
Fax: (257) 22 25 6828
Email: secretariat@icglr.org
Website: www.icglr.org/index.php/en/six-tools
International Conference on the Great Lake Regions (ICGLR)
General Info
The Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR according to its initials in German) is the central geoscientific authority providing advice to the German Federal Government in all geo-relevant questions. It is subordinate to the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi). BGR performs mainly research works in the fields of energy and mineral resources; groundwater; soil; deep subsurface uses; geological CO2 storage; international geoscientific cooperation; fundamental geoscientific information; final disposal of radioactive waste; nuclear weapons test ban; and geo-hazard assessments.
In its role as consultant to the federal government and the German industry BGR analyses and evaluates global mineral resource potentials and markets for metals, industrial minerals and non-metals. BGR researches and develops new exploration methods and strategies in the run-up to industrial activities, in particular for high-tech metals, known as "critical resources". It develops resource and development policy instruments and concepts for utilising mineral resources based on ecological, social and economic criteria. On behalf of the BMWi and the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ), the BGR supports efforts towards mineral certification targeting high value metals such as tantalum, tin, tungsten and gold in considered “conflict-affected or high-risk” countries. Concrete actions of this initiative have been:
1. The analytical fingerprint (AFP) project aiming at constraining mineralogical and geochemical characteristic features of tantalum, tin, and tungsten ore concentrates which may be used to link the concentrate to a specific production site.
2. The project on Certified Trading Chains (CTC), a voluntary certification scheme to foster traceability, transparency, and ethical production standards.
3. The partnership with the DRC Ministry of Mines to develop a mineral certification system in the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo on the background of a German-Congolese cooperation program.
4. Support the International Conference on the Great Lakes Region (ICGLR) in implementing its regional mineral certification mechanism (RCM) in selected member states, namely Rwanda and Burundi, as well as to establish the AFP as an independent monitoring tool of the RCM.

Certified Trading Chain Standard
The Certified Trading Chain (CTC) Standard is a voluntary system with two interrelated objectives. On the one hand, it aims to increase the contribution of the minerals sector to poverty reduction and the political stability of the targeted countries. On the other, it seeks to improve supply security for the processing industry and fosters responsibility in industrialized countries. The various stages of certified mineral production (upstream operations, namely from mining to export) are audited by an independent third-party against a set of criteria derived from five principles that integrate the Standard:
1. Origin and volumes of produced and traded goods as well as company payments to host governments are transparent. This is particularly relevant to ensure that the trade of designated minerals is conducted legally and does not support armed groups in the region.
2. The company does not use child labour and ensures fair remuneration and work conditions as well as continual improvement of health and safety measures for all employees.
3. The company ensures security on company sites whilst respecting human rights.
4. The company consults communities in which it operates and contributes to their social, economic and institutional development taking into account gender aspects.
5. The company seeks continual improvement of its environmental performance.

These five principles emerged from specific provisions in the Organization for Economic
Cooperation and Development’s (OECD) Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises (2000) and Risk Awareness Tool for Multinational Enterprises in Weak Governance Zones (2006), but also is based on some of the International Finance Corporation’s Performance Standards; the Voluntary Principles on Security and Human Rights; as well as national laws.

Contact Info
Geozentrum Hannover
Stilleweg 2
D-30655 Hannover, Germany
Tel: +49(0)511-643-0
Fax: +49(0)511-643-2304
Email: poststelle@bgr.de
Website: www.bgr.bund.de
Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe (BGR)                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            
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